Religious mobility and party support in Northern Ireland

by Richard Breen

Written in English
Published: Downloads: 166
Share This

Edition Notes

From: European Sociological review, vol.13, pp.225-239.

Statementby Richard Breen and Bernadette C. Hayes.
ContributionsHayes, Bernadette C.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18424424M

the religious dilemma in northern ireland insurrection versus resurrection 83 constitutional bulwarks are being steadily eroded, many experience a sense of loss, hurt and depression, there is a sense that in some way a «contract» between Britain and Ulster Protestants has been unilaterally broken.   In this paper I examine the relationship between social mobility, on the one hand, and, on the other, both constitutional preferences and political (left or right wing) preferences among Catholics and Protestants in Northern Ireland, using survey data collected in Ireland; Northern Ireland, with approximately million people, is composed of six counties and encompasses the remaining one-sixth of the island. 2 Many unionists and loyalists refer to the six counties that today make up Northern Ireland as “Ulster.” Technically.   An Early Attempt. A serious attempt to bring about a resolution to the conflict was made in when British and Irish prime ministers Margaret Thatcher and Garrett Fitzgerald signed the Anglo-Irish Agreement, which recognized for the first time the Republic of Ireland's right to have a consultative role in the affairs of Northern Ireland. However, Protestant politicians who opposed the.

This statistic shows the distribution of the religious orientations of residents of Northern Ireland on Ma , the day of the last National Census.   In she led marches in Northern Ireland and in the Republic of Ireland in support of IRA hunger strikers and opposing the conditions under which the strike was settled. In , members of the the Unionist Ulster Defense Association attempted to assassinate the McAliskeys and they were seriously injured in the attack despite British Army.   In just % of the resident population of Northern Ireland belonged to minority ethnic groups, this increased to % in - more than double the proportion in Religion.   image caption Demographics are shifting in Northern Ireland It is likely Catholics will outnumber Protestants by in Northern Ireland, according to a leading academic.

20 Religious Politics: Northern Ireland and England The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is located in Western ted from the mainland continent by the North Sea and English Channel, Great Britain includes England, Scotland, and Wales. West of Great Britain and separated by the Irish Sea, Northern Ireland is located at the northern end of an island mass that. In June that year, Northern Ireland’s biggest political party used its power of veto to block the legalization of same-sex marriage. A trend can be identified. Northern Ireland’s past is distinct by its religious conflicts that began the time when Celtic pagans realized their customs and religion cluttered by Christians with scripture and wielding swords. When Ireland was under British rule in the 18th century, the prohibited Catholics not to hold office in the parliament of Ireland, a rule that ran. The Free State was established as a Dominion of the British Commonwealth of comprised 26 of the 32 counties of Ireland. Northern Ireland, which comprised the remaining six counties, exercised its right under the Treaty to opt out of the new Free State government consisted of the Governor-General, the representative of the King, and the Executive Council (cabinet), which.

Religious mobility and party support in Northern Ireland by Richard Breen Download PDF EPUB FB2

There is a virtual absence of inter-sectarian party preferences (Protestants supporting Nationalist, and Catholics supporting Unionist, parties) and of inter-sectarian religious mobility. Because almost everyone in Northern Ireland was raised as a Catholic or Protestant, this leads to very limited patterns of religious by: Religious Mobility and Party Support in Northern Ireland Religious Mobility and Party Support in Northern Ireland Richard Breen, Bernadette C.

Hayes 13 No. 3, Richard Breen and Bernadette C. Hayes Although religion has long played an influential role in the structuring of electoral choice, the relationship between religious mobility and party preference has been.

Religious Mobility and Party Support in Northern Ireland Richard Breen and Bernadette C. Hayes Although religion has long played an influential role in the structuring of electoral choice, the relationship between religious mobility and party preference has been almost totally ignored by both political scientists and sociologists of religion.

Has conflict in Northern Ireland kept political dimensions of religion alive, and has religion played a role in fuelling conflict?Conflict in Northern Ireland is not and never will be a holy war. Yet religion is more socially and politically significant than many commentators presume. In fact, religion has remained a central feature of social identity and politics throughout conflict as well.

Religion, Identity and Politics in Northern Ireland book. Boundaries of Belonging and Belief. Religion, Identity and Politics in Northern Ireland. Drawing on a range of unique interview material, this book traces how individuals and groups in Northern Ireland have absorbed religious types of cultural knowledge, belonging and morality, and Cited by: But the role religion plays in Northern Ireland as a means of identity construction gives it an impact through processes of cultural, political, and ethnic reproduction.

Irrespective of the level of people’s personal faith, even for those who assiduously say they have none, religion in this second sense can never be avoided in Northern. \_J "the Troubles" in Northern Ireland were significantly religious in the past, but marginally so today. In their reviews of explanations of the Northern Ireland conflict, Darby (), Hickey (), Hunter (), Lijphart () and Whyte ( and ) find few giving any real weight to causes of a religious.

Collection Points for Christian Books Northern Ireland. Belfast; Templepatrick - Book Aid Bookshop Please email us [[email protected]] for the address of your nearest er to include your postcode in the e-mail. If your town is not listed above, would you consider becoming one of.

Northern Ireland - Northern Ireland - Religion: The demographic balance between Protestants and Roman Catholics in Northern Ireland is becoming increasingly delicate. Catholics now make up about two-fifths of the population, and their slightly higher birth rate has led to speculation that they eventually will become the larger of the “two communities.”.

They use government data from each census held in,and to show where Protestants (in blue) and Catholics (shown in green) live in Northern Ireland. SinceNorthern Ireland has devolved government within the United government and Parliament of the United Kingdom are responsible for reserved and excepted ed matters are a list of policy areas (such as civil aviation, units of measurement, and human genetics), which the Westminster Parliament may devolve to the Northern Ireland Assembly at some time in future.

Northern Ireland has more Christians in its population (93%) than Wales (%), Scotland (%), and England (%). About 8% of the population is not religious compared to % in England, % in Scotland, and % in Wales. Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland are both religious states with % the latter identifying as.

But in Northern Ireland, it can feel like God is a political player. A number of our politicians, including ministers, have faith and talk about it. That makes Northern Ireland different to many other countries in the Western world.

Professor John Brewer from Queen’s University in Belfast has researched links between politics and religion. For one thing, long-term demographic changes make it likely that Roman Catholics in Northern Ireland, most of whom identify as Irish nationalists, will soon become the largest religious.

The Northern Ireland Protestant majority would never vote to join a united Ireland, while surveys have revealed that support for it is waning further among the Province’s Roman Catholic minority,1 and 16% of the Sinn Féin electorate would not vote in favour of it either.

So far, Religion, Civil Society and Peace in Northern Ireland has been debated on BBC Radio Ulster’s major religion program and discussed at events such as the 4 Corners Festival in Belfast, a Christian festival organized by a group of clergy and laity.

Many clergy are aware of the arguments of the book and have mentioned them to me during. Ulster loyalism is the political movement for maintaining Northern Ireland within the United most unionists, loyalists are attached to the British monarchy, support the continued existence of Northern Ireland, and oppose a united loyalism has been described as a kind of ethnic nationalism and "a variation of British nationalism".

Northern Ireland - Northern Ireland - Government and society: Because Northern Ireland is a constituent element of the United Kingdom, its head of government is the British prime minister, and its head of state is the reigning monarch.

Although the Government of Ireland Act envisaged separate parliaments exercising jurisdiction over southern and northern Ireland, the architects of the. In my book Religious Leaders and Conflict Transformation: Northern Ireland and Beyond (Cambridge University Press, ), I argue that the leaders of the four main churches in Northern Ireland (Presbyterian, Church of Ireland, Methodist, and Roman Catholic) for the most part played a positive role in the transformation of the conflict over 30 years.

Has conflict in Northern Ireland kept political dimensions of religion alive, and has religion played a role in fuelling conflict. Conflict in Northern Ireland is not and never will be a holy war. Yet religion is more socially and politically significant than many commentators presume.

In fact, religion has remained a central feature of social identity and politics throughout conflict as well. Breen, R., Hayes, B. () ‘Religious Mobility and Party Support in Northern Ireland’, European Sociological Review, 13 (3), – Google Scholar Brewer, J.

() Anti-Catholicism in Northern Ireland – support the non-sectarian Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI) (Mitchell, ). Few people in Northern Ireland view the conflict in strictly religious terms.

The academic debate about the role of reli gion in the Northern Ireland conflict has co alesced round two broad and opposing positions. At one pole, there are those who. That makes Northern Ireland different to many other countries in the Western world. Professor John Brewer from Queen's University in Belfast has researched links between politics and religion.

This book should find a readership both in courses on the sociology (or politics) of religion in the contemporary world and in courses on Northern Ireland. I strongly recommend it'.

Jennifer Todd, University College Dublin ’ concisely synthesizes the vast literature on religion, society, and politics in Northern Ireland Recommended.

affiliations of their adherents to offer political choices cognisant of the support base. Religion, politics and moral issues in Northern Ireland Northern Ireland offers a very useful testing ground for the respective saliences of party, church and faith in shaping attitudes to moral questions.

Here, debates over the near-total ban on. They were mostly of British descent and wanted Northern Ireland to remain part of Britain. On the other side were the Nationalists, or Republicans – the Catholics. Their stated goal was to join the Republic of Ireland, which had won its independence in   The ultra-religious Northern Irish party about to help form a UK government, explained The election was a wake-up call for the UK to pay attention to its most religiously divided country.

In Northern Ireland’s earliest days, it had very nearly lost the western counties of Fermanagh and Tyrone and Derry local elections held under a proportional representation system injust before partition, Sinn Fein and the Irish Nationalist Party won control of Derry, Northern Ireland’s putative second city, and Fermanagh and Tyrone County Councils.

For example, within political debate on abortion in Northern Ireland religion and faith have been cited by politicians as the fundamental reason for their opposition to more liberal legislation. In addition politicians cite a unified faith perspective on opposition to abortion, both across the ‘two communities’ of Northern Ireland and the.

And on the Protestant side, the Ulster Unionist party, which favored continued British rule in the province, began losing support to firebrand Rev. Ian Paisley’s Democratic Unionist party.

The political scene in Northern Ireland was further complicated by a dangerous mix of armed groups on both sides. Secularism in the Republic of Ireland has been described as a "Quiet Revolution", comparable to the Quiet Revolution in is an unofficial term that encompasses a number of significant social and political movements related to secularism and secularization, which have occurred within the last thirty years, and involved no violence or force.

It has been described as a period where "the.However, Northern Ireland differs in that it has higher levels of religious affiliation and practice, and religion plays more roles in civil society than it does in other parts of Britain.

Very interesting-looking book about the role of organized religion in contributing to the peace process in Northern Ireland, Religion, Civil Society, and Peace in Northern Ireland (OUP ), by John D. Brewer (Aberdeen), Gareth I. Higgins (lecturer at Queens, Belfast, and Trinity College, Dublin), and Francis Teeney (Aberdeen).

The publisher.